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These are birds that I've observed at or near my home. There are a few exceptions such as the Great Horned Owl, the Snowy Owl and the Peregrine Falcon. However, they do frequent the area and I still have hope that I will see all of these birds in their natural environment. Having a feeder, nests, and a bird bath around the home helps to draw our feathered friends in for a closer look. You don't have to be a "birder" to enjoy these creatures.

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Year Around ResidentsMirating Birds, Breeders | Birds of Prey | Migration Map

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Cardinal Family
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Male Cardinal
Cardinals are quite common in our region and are frequently seen in pairs, the male red and female brownish red. These are robust, seed-eating birds with strong bills.
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Black-capped Chicadee - varieties
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Black-capped Chicadee - juvenile
Black-capped Chickadee is a small, North American songbird. It is notable for its capacity to lower its body temperature during cold winter nights, its good spatial memory to relocate the caches where it stores food, and its boldness near humans.  ... more ...
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Carolina Chickadee
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Carolina Chickadee
The Carolina Ckickadee is very similar to the Black-capped Chickadee, distinguished by the slightly browner wing with the greater coverts brown and the white fringing on the secondary feathers slightly less conspicuous; the tail is also slightly shorter and more square-ended.  ... more ...
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Tufted Titmouse Family
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Dark-eyed Junco - Mature Male
Dark-eyed Juncos are mainly seen in the winter in our area. Small flocks of these dark-gray little birds feed on the ground, and flash white outer tail feathers when they fly.  ... more ...
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The Tufted Titmouse Family
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Adult Tufted Titmouse
The Tufted Titmouse has grey upperparts and white underparts with a white face, a grey crest, a dark forehead and a short stout bill. Their preferred habitat is deciduous and mixed woods as well as gardens, parks and shrubland.  ... more ...
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House Finch
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House Finch - Mature Male
The House Finch is a frequent and colorful visitor to feeders. It has rose or reddish-orange on its bib and back. Now very common in the St. Louis area, it sometimes out-numbers House Sparrows and is seen here year-round.   ... more ...
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Purple Finch Gallery
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Purple Finch - Mature Male
The Purple Finch is similar to the House Finch but is even more colorful, less common and here only in the winter. The most obvious field mark is the bill. The bill of the Purple Finch is conical shaped whereas the upper mandible of the House Finch is curved downward..   ... more ...
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Ruby-throated Hummingbird
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Male American Goldfinch
The American Goldfinch , also known as the Eastern Goldfinch, is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is a migratory, brightly colored, easy to spot visitor to the garden. It is often found in residential areas, attracted to bird feeders which increase its survival rate in these areas.    ... more ...
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Eastern Bluebird Family
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Eastern Bluebird
The Eastern Bluebird is a small thrush found in open woodlands, farmlands and orchards, and most recently can be spotted in suburban areas. It is the state bird of Missouri and New York.    ... more ...
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House Sparrow
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House Sparrow
The House Sparrow is a small bird of the sparrow family, found in most parts of the world. Females and young birds are coloured pale brown and grey, and males have brighter black, white, and brown markings. The House Sparrow is strongly associated with human habitations.   ... more ...
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White-throated Sparrow
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White-throated Sparrow
The White-throated Sparrow is often seen in flocks; adults have bright white eyebrows and show contrast between mainly grayish breast and white throat. They mainly feed on the ground.  ... more ...
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Song Sparrow family
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Song Sparrow male
The Song Sparrow is a medium-sized American sparrow. Among the native sparrows in North America, it is easily one of the most abundant, variable and adaptable species. Many sparrows have streaky breasts, but only the Song Sparrow has a central dark blotch.  ... more ...
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Chipping Sparrow
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Chipping Sparrow - male
The Chipping Sparrow is distinguishable by the white stripe across the eye, dark eye line and the rusty crown on the top of their head. It is widespread, fairly tame, and common across most of its North American range.  ... more ...
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Eurasian Tree Sparrow
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Eurasian Tree Sparrow
The Eurasian Tree Sparrow makes St. Louis famous among birders because it is the only place in the United States where it is found. Its appearance is similar to the House Sparrow but it’s smaller, has a rufous crown, white collar and dark spot on the cheek.  ... more ...
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American Tree Sparrow
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American Tree Sparrow
The American Tree Sparrow has a rusty cap and grey underparts with a small dark spot on the breast, a rusty back with lighter stripes, brown wings with white bars and a slim tail. Their face is grey with a rusty line through the eye. They are similar in appearance to the Chipping Sparrow.  ... more ...
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Mourning Dove
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Mourning Dove
The Mourning Dove is a member of the dove family and is also called the Turtle Dove or the American Mourning Dove or Rain Dove. It is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American birds. They are easy to spot because they feed mainly on the ground and have a pointed tail.  ... more ...
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American Robin
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American Robin
The American Robin, also known as the Robin, is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European Robin because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European Robin belonging to the flycatcher family.   ... more ...
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Mockingbird Family
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Male Mockingbird
Mockingbirds are best known for the habit of mimicking the songs of other birds and the sounds of insects, often loudly and in rapid succession. Gray-brown, paler on the breast and belly, with two white wingbars on each wing. A white patch in each wing is often visible on perched birds, and in flight these become large white flashes.    ... more ...
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Carolina Wren - mature male
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Carolina Wren - juvenile
Carolina Wrens are small, rusty brown, very active birds with a white "eyebrow" and they cock their tails as they perch. They reside mainly in the eastern half of the USA, the extreme south of Ontario, Canada, and the extreme northeast of Mexico. ... more ...
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Blue Jay
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Blue Jay
The Blue Jay is resident through most of eastern and central United States. It breeds in both deciduous and coniferous forests, and is common near and in residential areas. It is predominately blue with a white chest and underparts, and a blue crest. It has a black, U-shaped collar around its neck and a black border behind the crest.     ... more ...
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Brown-headed Cowbird
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Brown-headed Cowbird
The Brown-headed Cowbird is a stocky blackbird with a fascinating approach to raising its young. Females forgo building nests and instead they lay in the nests of other birds, abandoning their young to foster parents, usually at the expense of at least some of the host’s own chicks.     ... more ...
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Common Grackle Family
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Common Grackle Male
The Common Grackle adults have a long, dark bill, pale yellowish eyes and a long tail; its feathers appear black with purple, green or blue iridescence on the head, and primarily bronze sheen in the body plumage. The adult female, is smaller, less iridescent and her tail is shorter. The juvenile is brown with dark brown eyes.
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American Crow
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American Crow
The American Crow is a common bird found throughout much of North America. Similar to the Raven, it is smaller in size. American Crows are common, widespread and adaptable, but they are highly susceptible to the West Nile Virus. They are monitored as a bioindicator.     ... more ...
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Mockingbird Family
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White-breasted Nuthatch in Heman Park (image by Arno Perlow)
White-breasted Nuthatches are active, agile little birds with an appetite for insects and large, meaty seeds. They get their common name from their habit of jamming large nuts and acorns into tree bark, then whacking them with their sharp bill to “hatch” out the seed from the inside.    ... more ...
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Downy Woodpecker Family
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Downy Woodpecker male and female(R)
The Downy Woodpecker is mainly black on the upperparts and wings, with a white back, throat and belly and white spotting on the wings. There is a white bar above the eye and one below. They have a black tail with white outer feathers barred with black.     ... more ...
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Red-bellied Woodpecker Family
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Male Red-bellied Woodpecker
The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is quite common in Missouri. Its common name is somewhat misleading, as the most prominent red part of its plumage is on the head whereas the reddish tinge on the belly that gives the bird its name is difficult to see in field identification.    ... more ...
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Northern Flicker
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Northern Flicker
The Yellow-shafted Flicker resides in eastern North America. They are yellow under the tail and underwings and have yellow shafts on their primaries. They have a grey cap, a beige face and a red bar at the nape of their neck. Males have a black moustache. It tends to feed on the ground looking for ants.  ... more ...

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Eastern Phoebe
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Eastern Phoebe
The Eastern Phoebe is a small passerine bird. This tyrant flycatcher breeds in eastern North America, although its normal range does not include the southeastern coastal United States. It is migratory, wintering in the southernmost USA.    ... more ...
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Ruby-throated Hummingbird
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Ruby-throated Hummingbird
The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is a species of hummingbird that belongs to the family Trochilidae and is currently included in the order Apodiformes. This small animal is the only species of hummingbird that regularly nests east of the Mississippi River in North America.    ... more ...
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House Wren
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House Wren
The House Wren is plain brown bird with an effervescent voice, the House Wren is a common backyard bird over nearly the entire Western Hemisphere. Listen for its rush-and-jumble song in summer and you’ll find this species zipping through shrubs and low tree branches.    ... more ...
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Gray Catbird
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Gray Catbird
The Gray Catbird, also spelled grey catbird, is a medium-sized northern American perching bird of the mimid family. It is the only member of the "catbird" genus Dumetella.    ... more ...
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Summer Tanager Family
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Summer Tanager male
The Summer Tanager is the only completely red bird in North America, the strawberry-colored male Summer Tanager is an eye-catching sight against the green leaves of the forest canopy. The mustard-yellow female is harder to spot. Both sexes have a very distinctive chuckling call note.    ... more ...
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Indigo Bunting Family
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Male Indigo Bunting
The all-blue male Indigo Bunting sings with cheerful gusto and looks like a scrap of sky with wings. Sometimes nicknamed "blue canaries," these brilliantly colored yet common and widespread birds whistle their bouncy songs through the late spring and summer all over eastern North America.    ... more ...
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Male and Female Cedar Waxwing
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Male Cedar Waxwing
The Cedar Waxwing is a native of North and Central America, breeding in open wooded areas in southern Canada and wintering in the southern half of the United States. Its diet includes cedar cones, fruit, and insects.    ... more ...
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Baltimore Oriole Family
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Male Baltimore Oriole
The rich, whistling song of the Baltimore Oriole, echoing from treetops near homes and parks, is a sweet herald of spring in eastern North America. Look way up to find these singers: the male’s brilliant orange plumage blazes from high branches like a torch.    ... more ...
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Rose-breasted Grosbeak Family
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Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bursting with black, white, and rose-red, male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are like an exclamation mark at your bird feeder or in your binoculars. Females and immatures are streaked brown and white with a bold face pattern and enormous bill. Look for these birds in forest edges and woodlands.    ... more ...
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Wood Thrush
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Wood Thrush
The Wood Thrush is a North American passerine bird. It is closely related to other thrushes such as the American robin and is widely distributed across North America, wintering in Central America and southern Mexico.    ... more ...
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Brown Thrasher
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Brown Thrasher
Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Brown Thrashers are exuberant singers, with one of the largest repertoires of any North American songbird.    ... more ...
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Summer Tanager Family
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Summer Tanager male
Yellow-billed Cuckoos are slender, long-tailed birds that manage to stay well hidden in deciduous woodlands. They usually sit stock still, even hunching their shoulders to conceal their crisp white underparts, as they hunt for large caterpillars.    ... more ...

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Red-tailed Hawk
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Red-tailed Hawk
The Red-tailed Hawk is a large stocky hawk. Typical light-phase birds have whitish breast and rust-colored tail. Young birds duller, more streaked, lacking rust-colored tail of adult; they are distinguished from Red-shouldered and Swainson's hawks by their stocky build, broader, more rounded wings, and white chest. ... more ...
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Cooper's Hawk
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Cooper's Hawk
Cooper's Hawk is among the bird world’s most skillful fliers. They are common woodland hawks that tear through cluttered tree canopies in high speed pursuit of other birds. You’re most likely to see one prowling above a forest edge or field using just a few stiff wingbeats followed by a glide. Similar to the smaller Sharp-shinned Hawk. ... more ...
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Red Tailed Hawk
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Sharp-shinned Hawk
The Sharp-shinned Hawk is a small hawk described from Hispaniola, with males being the smallest hawks in the United States and Canada, but with the species averaging larger than some Neotropical species, such as tiny hawk. ... more ...
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Merlin
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Merlin
The Merlin small species of falcon from the Northern Hemisphere. A bird of prey once known colloquially as a pigeon hawk in North America, the merlin breeds in the northern Holarctic; some migrate to subtropical and northern tropical regions in winter. ... more ...
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The American Kestrel
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The Americsn Kestrel
The American Kestrel , sometimes colloquially known as the sparrow hawk, is a small falcon, and the only kestrel found in the Americas. It is the most common falcon in North America, and is found in a wide variety of habitats. It is also the smallest falcon in North America. ... more ...
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Peregrine Falcon
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Peregrine Falcon
The Peregrine Falcon is a large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head and "moustache". The peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 200 mph during its characteristic hunting stoop (high speed dive), making it the fastest member of the animal kingdom. ... more ...
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Barred Owl
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Barred Owl
The Barred Owl is a large typical owl native to North America. Best known as the hoot owl for its distinctive call, it goes by many other names, including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl. ... more ...
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The Barn Owl
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Barn Owl Chicks
The Barn Owl is the most widely distributed species of owl, and one of the most widespread of all birds. It is also referred to as the common barn owl. The barn owl is found almost everywhere in the world except polar and desert regions. ... more ...
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The Great Horned Owl
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The Great Horned Owl
The Great Horned Owl , also known as the tiger owl (originally derived from early naturalists' description as the "winged tiger" or "tiger of the air") or the hoot owl, is a large owl native to the Americas. It is an extremely adaptable bird with a vast range and is the most widely distributed true owl in the Americas. ... more ...
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Snowy Owl
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Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl This yellow-eyed, black-beaked white bird is easily recognizable. It is 20–28 in long, with a 49–59 in wingspan. It is one of the largest species of owl in North America. The adult male is virtually pure white, but females and young birds have some dark scalloping. ... more ...

Bird Migration Map